Hail, Caesar! Movie Review

Hail, Caesar! Is a movie that is set in the 1950s concentrated on Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin).  Eddie is known as a “fixer” and his job is to keep all the big egos in check at a movie studio.

Eddie is surrounded by a wide variety of people that adds to the dynamic of just how difficult it is to manage these people.  The problem really becomes an issue when in the big release his main star Baird Whitlock (George Clooney) goes missing.  Baird going missing, however, doesn’t seem to be a concern for Eddie until he gets a phone call that he has actually been kidnap Eddie takes this problem seriously.  Eddie goes around trying to put the fires out, because of the press has gone wind of the fact that Baird is missing and wants to know about it.  While the interesting thing about this is both reporters are twins and one has the facts right and the other doesn’t.

Baird Whitlock as he recovers from being kidnapped

The kidnap though has an interesting undertone though with current political climate because of the kidnappers were writers but they were after a communist belief and it felt a little weird because Baird started to take some interest in their cause.  It was depicted in such a way that it was seen that Baird was being brainwashed while being invited to talk to his captives and could essentially be a tool for this group to go up against the establishment and capitalism in this case the studio.  Baird wasn’t the only focus, however, wasn’t the only movie in the making as you’d expect.  Which lead to some interesting sketches from a star-studded affair.

The acting in Hail Caesar was as good as you’d expect from a cast with Scarlett Johansson, George Clooney, Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum in just to name the household name but they story felt a little disjointed and struggled to be entertaining at times.  The few sketches that were felt like it wasn’t really relevant to the story in most respects.

Eddie neogatiating with one of his starts

The Verdict

Hail, Caesar! Is a star-studded affair with a relatively interesting storyline however the sketches just didn’t feel linked or have much relevance to the story.  The problem is although in each sketch Eddie does fix a problem and it is possible to see that he’s important and needed in the studio, that said though the stars do seem to find their own solution.  The major decision of the story Eddie finds himself trying to decide never really seems to have any other outcome.  It is a star-studded affair and enjoyable but lacks some continuity and ultimately feels like a bit of let down.